Sandy Lyle, a two-time major champion and member of the World Golf Hall of Fame, will make his debut appearance in the Scottish Senior Open at Craigielaw Golf Club, East Lothian, from August 16-18.

One of Scotland’s all-time greats, Lyle (picture by Getty Images) adds star quality to a field which already contains two Major winners in Ian Woosnam of Wales and Lyle’s fellow Scot, Paul Lawrie.

Lyle, 61, won The Open in 1985 before becoming the first British player to capture the Masters Tournament at Augusta National three years later. He also won the Players Championship at Sawgrass in 1987.

Lyle won the European Open on Scottish soil at Turnberry in his first full season on the European Tour. However, he is returning to his homeland next month in a bid to land his first Staysure Tour title in Scotland.

Lyle aims to become the fifth Scot to carry off the Scottish Senior Open, following David Huish (1998), Bill Longmuir (2004), Sam Torrance (2006) and Gary Orr, who defied blustery conditions to claim the title at the same venue last year.

He said: “I am excited to be playing in my first Scottish Senior Open next month. I’ve played in many Opens in Scotland and always enjoyed the warmth and support of the home fans.

“I know many of the East Lothian courses exceptionally well from my time living in the area and I am looking forward to playing Craigielaw for the first time alongside some of my fellow Major winners such as Paul Lawrie and Ian Woosnam.”

This will be the fifth consecutive year that the £250,000 tournament has been played in East Lothian, Scotland’s renowned Golf Coast.

Paul Broadhurst of England won at Archerfield Links in 2015 and again at Renaissance Club in 2017w ith fellow countryman Paul Eales succeeding at Archerfield in 2016 and Orr landing the silverware last time.

Entry to the three days of competition is free but car parking is £5 per car with all money being donated to a local charity.

Parking is free for purchasers of tickets for the recent Aberdeen Standard Investments Scottish Open.