Jeffrey Archer, former politician and prolific author will speak at an exclusive Edinburgh International Book Festival event in the capital next month. This is part of the Booked! series of events supported by players of People’s Postcode Lottery.

Usher Hall Blue Sky Glass

He will launch This Was a Man at the talk which is the final instalment in his best-selling Clifton Chronicles bringing the series to a conclusion. Archer will speak with Ruth Wishart on stage at the Usher Hall at 7:00pm on Wednesday 9 November 2016. There will be an audience Q & A after the 1 hour 15 minutes event and there will be a book signing afterwards.

Nick Barley, Director of the Edinburgh International Book Festival, said “Jeffrey Archer spoke at the very first Edinburgh International Book Festival, back in 1983 and it seemed appropriate to invite him back to Edinburgh to close his latest epic series as we approach the 70th anniversary of Edinburgh as a world leading Festival city.  The Clifton Chronicle series is a publishing phenomenon, with total English language worldwide sales so far of 7.1 million, and this event provides an ideal opportunity to look back at the series as a whole, as well as exploring Jeffrey’s unique career in more depth.”

Jeffrey Archer, whose novels and short stories include Kane and AbelA Prisoner of Birth and Cat O’ Nine Tales, has topped the bestseller lists around the world, with sales of over 275 million copies. He is the only author ever to have been a number one bestseller in fiction, short stories and non-fiction (The Prison Diaries). Archer set out at the age of 70 to write The Clifton Chronicles and it has turned out to be his boldest undertaking yet, bringing to life the key historical and political events of the 20th century over the course of one family’s story, with their triumphs and their tragedies. It’s a thrilling episodic saga of love, loss, betrayal and ambition, taking the reader on an exhilarating journey from the back alleys of Bristol to the teeming streets of New York City and the gulags of Stalinist Russia, and has been published in 28 languages worldwide.

Tickets are available from the Usher Hall from 10am on Thursday 6 October priced £12 (£10 concessions) and seating is allocated. The Usher Hall Box office is open 10.00am to 5.30pm Monday to Saturday, Tel 0131 228 1155 or https://tickets.usherhall.co.uk.  Copies of This Was a Man will be available to purchase at the event.

With the support of City of Edinburgh Libraries, the Book Festival is inviting members of local reading and community groups who have never previously attended an Edinburgh International Book Festival event to come and hear Jeffrey speak, encouraging more people to develop a love of books and reading by bringing them together with an international bestseller for the first time.

This event is part of the Edinburgh International Book Festival’s Booked! programme, supported by players of People’s Postcode Lottery. Booked! is the Edinburgh International Book Festival on the road around Scotland, throughout the year. A celebration of words and ideas, Booked! blends the very best from groups and organisations across the country with the energy and excitement of the August Book Festival. Produced in collaboration with a variety of partners, this wide-ranging programme of events and activities brings authors, artists and audiences together to inspire each other and to be inspired, to share stories and experiences, and bring books to life for people of all ages in their own communities.

Clara Govier, Head of Charities, People’s Postcode Lottery, said “Booked! allows the Edinburgh International Book Festival to reach communities from across Scotland and we are delighted that as a result of funding from players of People’s Postcode Lottery, you don’t just have to visit Charlotte Square Gardens to enjoy what the Book Festival has to offer.”

1 COMMENT

  1. Why would anybody pay good money to listen to a slimy Tory crook like Jeffrey Archer. Is he going to talk about the perils of perjury? Obviously this book festival has very little to do with literature?

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