Luke Jerram’s In Memoriam, which will be presented as part of this year’s Edinburgh Science Festival, is a touring art work displayed at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, marking its first visit to Scotland. The installation is a temporary memorial for the public to visit and remember all those we have lost from the COVID-19 pandemic. In Memoriam is also made in tribute to all the NHS health and care workers who have been risking their lives during the crisis.

Referencing those people who have been in hospital and care homes during this crisis, the flags are created from NHS bed sheets and arranged in the form of a medical logo.

Luke Jerram is a world-renowned artist whose multidisciplinary practice involves the creation of sculptures, installations and live arts projects. Luke is now known globally for his innovative large-scale public artworks, including the famous Museum of Moon, experienced by more than 10 million people worldwide.

Festival Director Amanda Tyndall with the artist Luke Jerram

Luke Jerram said: “It’s amazing to be part of the Edinburgh Science Festival and to present my artwork In Memoriam in Scotland for the first time, in the beautiful surroundings of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh. I hope it will allow the space and time for reflection to those who need it.”

Amanda Tyndall, Festival Director said: “We have long been committed to the merging of science and the arts to provide the public with meaningful interactions with the science so central to all our lives. Luke’s work is a wonderful example of the power this can have and is a moving and fitting tribute to those we have lost and to the exceptional people that have helped us through such challenging times.”

Focusing on climate crisis, global pandemic of Covid-19 and celebrating women in STEM, the 33rd Edinburgh Science Festival is currently underway with a theme of One World: Science Connects Us and Cirrus Logic as its Headline Sponsor. Featuring over 220 in-person exhibitions, installations and a wide range of walks, tours and trails, the Festival is a perfect opportunity for people to safely get a live science experience this summer.

Its ambitious digital programme of talks, workshops and downloadable resources for people of all ages means that this year’s Festival truly connects sci-curious people around the globe.

To book your free entry to the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh visit: https://www.rbge.org.uk/visit/visiting-us-during-covid-19/visiting-the-botanics-and-staying-safe/

Alongside Luke Jerram’s In Memoriam, some of the other outdoor and in-person exhibitions and walks on offer include ‘Pale Blue Dot’ at the National Museum of Scotland, delving deep into all things marine, celebrating some of UK’s greatest engineering innovations – ‘This is Engineering… As You’ve Never Seen It Before’ on The Mound, ‘Women in STEM’ Street Art Trail, highlighting the achievements of 9 remarkable scientists through large-scale graffiti portraits displayed around Edinburgh or ‘Oscillation in Light and Sound’, an interactive exploration of light and sound using giant crystals scattered around St Andrew Square. To browse the full offer of in person events, walks and exhibitions in and around Edinburgh, visit www.sciencefestival.co.uk

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